Career Counseling

Editorial Good Morning Kashmir
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The pressure to make career and education choices can be a nerve wracking experience for students with ambiguity and uncertainty looming large over their heads. Career Counseling is a process that focuses on helping one understand one’s own self, as well as work trends, so that one can make an informed decision about career and education. Career Counseling helps manage a diverse range of problems such as low concentration levels to poor time management, trust issues with family to non-agreement between parents and children on which career to choose. According to statistics, 44% Indian youth say career counseling is important for them but only 1 out of 10 students receive career guidance in India, 93% of Indian schools don’t have career counselors leading to 77% drop out after class 10. India needs 1.4 million career counselors to achieve the standard ratio of 250:1 prescribed by International School Counselors Associations (ISCA). Though the problems of decreased awareness, parental and peer influence, and confusion are similar both in India and western countries, it is more intense here due to the large population and demographic. As per various reports, the market size for career assessment & guidance is over Rs. 5,000 crore in India and is continuously growing.

 

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Counselor’s can analyze our personality through which we can evaluate ourselves with the best possible career options which suit us. Career counseling not only helps in making a great personality but also in making us more organized and better individuals. In this techno-savvy world, career counseling has expanded its length and breadth so that it can reach a mass audience .Through different career counseling sessions students can develop a problem-solving attitude which can be helpful in resolving their career queries. Geopolitical concerns have impacted student mobility, both within the country and internationally, putting higher education and career plans on hold for millions of students.It is estimated that by 2030, 825 million youth in low and middle-income nations and 260 million in India alone will leave school without the skills needed for the modern workforce. This global crisis of unprepared youth has significant negative implications for colleges, universities and industry. Most schools continue to focus largely on imparting academic knowledge without any focus on bridging this knowledge to the world of careers. We need to focus more in this regard as it is a significant process of guiding students on the path to self-discovery and self-realization.

 

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