Future of Nuclear Weapons

Editorial Good Morning Kashmir
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Although nuclear weapons have only been used twice in warfare in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 but, about 13400 reportedly remain in our world today and there have been over 2000 nuclear tests conducted to date. The year 2020 marked the 50th anniversary of the NPT’s entry into force. The world’s nuclear powers have a capacity to kill millions directly and has the potential to kill billions by its impact on agriculture. Nuclear weapons technology was developed during the 1930s and 1940s. Since the bombings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons has been an important issue in international relations. Despite progress in reducing nuclear weapon arsenals since the Cold War, the world’s combined inventory of nuclear warheads remains at a very high level: Nine countries possessed roughly 13,150 warheads as of mid-2021. Approximately 91 percent of all nuclear warheads are owned by Russia and the United States who each have around 4,000 warheads in their military stockpiles; no other nuclear-armed state sees a need for more than a few hundred nuclear weapons for national security.

 

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The Treaty on the Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons ( NPT) will no longer be a vehicle for states to discuss important issues of nuclear disarmament, non proliferation and peaceful uses of nuclear technology. The plan called Creating an Environment for Nuclear Disarmament (CEND) is for working groups of 25 to 30 states each to meet and explore ways to overcome specific challenges. At the 2018 NPT Preparatory Committee meeting the United Nations issued a working paper that Washington argued would enable further arms reductions. The goal of solving global conflicts to establish more amenable conditions for future disarmament is laudable but there are significant challenges inherent in the working group approach. A sustainable nuclear order for the 21st century must accommodate changing global power dynamics. The established and global powers should pledge publicly to work together to promote nuclear non proliferation.Regional Nuclear Weapon Free Zones( NWFZ ) have been established to strengthen global nuclear non proliferation and disarmament norms and consolidate international efforts towards peace and prosperity.

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